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FBI Eye On Defcon Hackers Meet


Federal intelligence officials are in Las Vegas this week to try to recruit hackers at the annual Defcon convention.

The National Security Agency, Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security and NASA will all descend on the gathering to tempt some of the most talented hackers to join their ranks.  NSA official Richard George says they’re looking to hire the “best and brightest” hackers to join offensive and defensive efforts in the cyber wars.  The spy agency is looking to hire some 15-hundred people by September 30th and another 15-hundred in the year that follows.  Defcon runs today through the 7th.

A Very Funny hypocrite Situation (MUST READ)


In a small town in America, a person decided to open up his bar
business, which was right opposite to a church. The church & its
congregation started a campaign to block the bar from opening with
petitions and prayed daily against his business.

Work progressed. However, when it was almost complete and was about to
open a few days later, a strong lightning struck the bar and it was
burnt to the ground. The church folk were rather smug in their outlook
after that, till The bar owner sued the church authorities for
$2million on the grounds that the church through its congregation &
prayers was ultimately responsible For the demise of his bar shop,
either through direct or indirect actions or means.

In its reply to the court, the church vehemently denied all
responsibility or any connection that their prayers were reasons to
the bar shop’s demise. In support of their claim they referred to the
Benson study at Harvard that inter-cessionary prayer had no impact !

As the case made its way into court, the judge looked over the
paperwork and at the hearing and commented:

‘I don’t know how I am going to decide this case, but it appears from
the paperwork, we have a bar owner who believes in the power of prayer
and we have an entire church and its devotees that doesn’t.’

LulzSec Member Claimed Arrested By Police


Among many news surrounding the hacker movement called AntiSec, one report appeared to be quite interesting. Fox News announced that tFlow, a high-profile member of LulzSec hacker group, was arrested in the United Kingdom and is currently facing extradition to the US. However, Anonymous members didn’t confirm the report, but Fox News insist they tell the truth.

Fox News repeatedly confirmed the hacker’s identity both online and in responses to the queries made. Their story is that 16-year-old tFlow was arrested and out on bail. Meanwhile, Anonymous members provided the public with a link to tFlow’s Twitter account, which hasn’t been updated in a while, but tFlow is recognized as a kind of a user that isn’t always on Twitter.

The media reported that the teenager is currently facing extradition to the US over his involvement with LulzSec. tFlow was arrested in south London during another wave of online attacks, and remained in custody for a night. London Police believe the teenager is connected to the notorious hacking groups blamed for a handful of attacks on agencies like the CIA and the US Senate. The boy was held under the Computer Misuse Act and the reports are that his nickname appeared to be tFlow – a name of the high-ranking LulzSec member. Still, the hacker groups haven’t confirmed the news thus far.

Anonymous said that all they know is that some 16-year-old boy from South London was arrested who was suspected to be tFlow. Later the boy was released on bail with no charges to go back for additional questioning next month. Without any other information, it makes no sense to confirm it was the real tFlow. The only person who may confirm the news is tFlow himself.

By the way, it wasn’t the first time the media falsely announced a high-profile hacktivist has been arrested. Earlier, when the reports were that an arrest was made in the United Kingdom, media claimed LulzSec’s leader Sabu had been arrested, which appeared to be not true. Instead, it turned out to be someone running an IRC server and wasn’t heavily involved in the hacking. Now the truth is that nobody really knows the online identity of the arrested boy except himself. It may be a high-ranking (16-year-old?) LulzSec member, facing extradition to the US over the suspicion of being connected with Anonymous, but still there’s no evidence of him being tFlow.

Source: http://extratorrent.com/article/1474/lulzsec+member+claimed+arrested.html

8 Awesome LulzSec Images


Here are some images from the LulzSec Hackers Group. Enjoy 😀

 

 

 

 

 

 

So this is all from my side.

every picture here has something within it.

like the first image of LulzSec Which The World Encountered In The Sony Attacks.

rest of them were used by lulzsec in their press releases or as their twitter profile photo.

Some Amazing And Shocking Facts Of Mobile Phone Usage


200,000,000,000,000 (two hundred trillion) text messages are received in America every single day, which is more than an entire year’s worth of regular mail that’s received in America. 3339 is average number of texts sent by an American teen each month.

 

Source: http://www.skitzone.com/2011/the-shocking-numbers-behind-cell-phone-usage-infographic/

History Of The Internet: Picture Says It All


this is the history of the internet

Now Anonymous Strikes In The Name Of Antisec


Anonymous has picked up where the recently disbanded LulzSec left off.

The hacking organization released information to the Web last night from the Cyberterrorism Defense Initiative’s Security and Network Training Initiative and National Education Laboratory (SENTINEL) program. The SENTINEL program was “administered” by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to “educate technical personnel in cyberterrorism response and prevention.”

The SENTINEL training program was designed for personnel in public safety, law enforcement, state and local government, and public utilities. Health care professionals and employees at colleges and universities were also trained in the program.

Anonymous used its Twitter account yesterday to announce its intention to post data from the program on the Web, asking its followers if they were “ever interested in anti-cyberterrorism training.” Not long after, Anonymous published information on the program.

According to Australia’s ABC, the files, which were apparently published in 2009, include information on publicly available hacking resources and lists of FBI bureau addresses. The data also includes information on “hacking and counter-hacking tools,” as well as form letters that could be used to obtain user information from Internet Service Providers, the ABC is reporting.

The latest data release from Anonymous comes just two days after its fellow hacking group LulzSec announced that it had disbanded. The group said in a statement on Saturday that it had planned to operate for just 50 days with the ultimate goal of putting people on notice.

“It’s time to say bon voyage,” LulzSec wrote in its statement. “Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance, leaving behind–we hope–inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love. If anything, we hope we had a microscopic impact on someone, somewhere. Anywhere.”

Over that 50-day period, LulzSec made headlines by attacking PBS, Sony Pictures, and the Central Intelligence Agency, among other prominent organizations. More recently, the group announced an alliance with Anonymous called Operation Anti-Security, or AntiSec. The goal of their alliance, they said earlier this month, was “to steal and leak any classified government information…Prime targets are banks and other high-ranking establishments.”

The groups said that if they were censored in anyway, “we will obliterate the censor with cannonfire anointed with lizard blood.”

The SENTINEL release is a continuation of AntiSec. Following LulzSec’s disbandment, the group’s members joined Anonymous and continued their operation.

“We can confirm that all @LulzSec members have reported aboard,” Anonymous wrote on its Twitter account yesterday. “#AntiSec will have full support from #Anonymous and LulzSec. Expect us, soon.”

Hackers school next generation at DEFCON Kids


SAN FRANCISCO — DEFCON hackers will share their skills with the next generation at a first-ever children’s version of the infamous gathering of software renegades, lock pickers and social engineers.

DEFCON Kids will take place in Las Vegas on August 6-7 during the 19th annual DEFCON started by hackers such as “Dark Tangent” when they were young computer coding or hardware cracking rebels.

“Hackers are getting older and having kids,” said Joe Grand, a DEFCON veteran known as ‘Kingpin’ who has wowed attendees with event badges made of circuit boards that could be hacked to serve as radios or other gadgets.

“It is interesting to follow the process of other people’s backup units; how they are coming along.”

Grand, 35, recalling teen years in which his electronics skills got him benefits such as free telephone calls and trouble like an arrest for “computer-related stuff” he didn’t detail.

“I was scared straight and there was nobody there to guide me straight,” said Grand, who will teach hardware hacking at DEFCON Kids, which is open to children ages eight to 16.

“It feels nice to have an opportunity to be a mentor for kids who might be outcasts at school for having skills that aren’t cool; that other kids don’t understand.”

Grand’s two-and-a-half-year-old son has his own work space in dad’s lab where he excitedly looks forward to being old enough to solder circuits.

A hacker conference for children is controversial even in the DEFCON community.

Prime targets for criticism include lock picking and social engineering, the art of manipulating people into revealing sensitive information.

“Everyone is up in arms that we are going to teach kids to be evil, but that is not the case,” said Chris Hadnagy, who trains companies to guard against slick-talking hackers and runs the website social-engineer.org.

“Think critically, think objectively — that is what this industry teaches people,” continued Hadnagy, a DEFCON Kids mentor.

“The Internet is a breeding ground of predators, and not falling for those things is a skill I want my kids to have when someone is trying to manipulate them into something; whether it is peer pressure or a malicious adult.”

Hadnagy and others behind DEFCON Kids were adamant that in a world where children are surrounded by technology it is smart to provide guidance and a place where they can safely, and legally, test hacker skills.

Hadnagy, whose book Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking came out this year, tailored a “Capture the Flag” game for the event.

The game will include deciphering clues, picking locks, and reading body language and subtle facial expressions.

“Kids are great at it,” said Hadnagy. “This gives them a chance to grow into what we are now, the ones who keep companies secure.”

Since DEFCON debuted in 1993, many once-nefarious attendees have become computer security good guys bent on defending companies and homes against cyberattacks.

Government agents once flushed out in a game called “Spot the Fed” at the world’s largest hacker gathering are now welcomed on panels such as “Meet the Fed.” National police agencies recruit talent at DEFCON.

DEFCON founder Jeff Moss, whose hacker handle is Dark Tangent, is on a White House homeland defense council and heads security for the agency in charge of Internet addresses.

The US National Security Agency is to bring a museum-quality cryptography exhibit this year.

“While DEFCON has a bit of edgy counter-culture to it, there is a need to harness, direct and encourage children,” said Christofer Hoff, a hacker dad and a lock picking tutor at DEFCON Kids. “It is a natural complement.”

Hoff has taught his daughters to pick locks and launched HacKids camps in the United States about a year ago after peers in the security industry wondered how to hook children on science and math skills.

“I got to learn about computers and do fun stuff like trebuchets and marshmallow gun fights,” said his 10-year-old daughter and hackid.org camp attendee Chloe. “It was really cool to figure out how things work.”

Hoff’s girls will be volunteer “goons” helping at DEFCON Kids, where his session was renamed “The physics of locks.”

“When we talk about teaching kids hacking it is about the creative, sometimes interesting out-of-the-box embracing of science, math, computers…to get their creative juices flowing,” Hoff said.

“If you teach a kid how to light a match, does it mean he will turn into an arsonist?” he asked rhetorically. “Probably not, but he will learn how not to burn himself.”

Information was online at defconkids.org.

sources:- http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jWozBZCHptLP4ltjsXgcGp-pcqug?docId=CNG.d755fb3590fac5e2a2e8cb9bce13e229.121